How does deportation history affect EB-5? - EB5Investors.com

How does deportation history affect EB-5?

I was deported from the U.S. in 1995 trying to enter through Canada. I used to have a work permit but when I tried to enter in 1995 they refused it and deported me back to Canada through a court order. Now after 19 years I have gathered wealth and would like to apply for the EB-5 visa. Based on my deportation history, would I be eligible for it or not?

Answers

Shahzad Q Qadri

Shahzad Q Qadri

RC Creators
Answered on

We would have to review your deportation orders to determine whether you are eligible or not.

Fredrick W Voigtmann

Fredrick W Voigtmann

Immigration Attorneys
Answered on

The reason for your deportation should be reviewed and analyzed prior to answering this question. You should consult with an experienced immigration attorney who can review your immigration court record and your immigration history to determine whether or not you are admissible to the United States. In other words, I would have to review your complete file before giving you a definitive answer.

Philip H Teplen

Philip H Teplen

Immigration Attorneys
Answered on

From what you express, you can indeed qualify for re-entry after deportation. I suggest that you please give me a call.

Roberto Ortiz

Roberto Ortiz

Immigration Attorneys
Answered on

My recommendation would be for you to obtain a copy of your immigration file which you can do through a Freedom of Information request in order to be able to familiarize with the case and be able to properly give you advice.

Kripa Upadhyay

Kripa Upadhyay

Immigration Attorneys
Answered on

Typically, once removed from the United States - either under an order of removal from Court or at the border, an individual is not eligible to re-enter the U.S. for 10 years after the removal. The basis of the prior removal is something that needs to be carefully considered in your case, especially if there are any criminal convictions/basis for the prior court ordered removal as there are grounds of removability/deportability that will also make you inadmissible into the United States. You need to consult with an immigration attorney who is also knowledgeable in issues of deportation. Please feel free to call or email me if I can be of assistance.

Lynne Feldman

Lynne Feldman

Immigration Attorneys
Answered on

Normally after 10 years this is not an issue but we would need to review the deportation order and reason for deportation to see if that would affect your ability to immigrate and whether a waiver is required.

Ed Beshara

Ed Beshara

Immigration Attorneys
Answered on

Based upon the facts, you may apply for conditional permanent residency. On the assumption the deportation order requires you to be absent from the US for 10 years, you are now 19 years later eligible to apply for residency to be able to enter the US and live permanently in the US.

Charles H Kuck

Charles H Kuck

Immigration Attorneys
Answered on

The time frame barring your reentry to the U.S. has now passed, so your prior removal will not be a problem, so long as it is disclosed, and so long as there was no prior fraud or misrepresentation, or a prior criminal conviction. Please call to discuss your options, with your specific history.

Salvatore Picataggio

Salvatore Picataggio

Immigration Attorneys
Answered on

You may be eligible, but we would review your history in detail and determine the best approach to your new U.S. immigration process.

Stephen Berman

Stephen Berman

Immigration Attorneys
Answered on

An 18 year old deportation will not prevent you from immigrating to the U.S.

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