What should I do if I received my EB-5 green card while I am abroad? - EB5Investors.com

What should I do if I received my EB-5 green card while I am abroad?

I was recently informed that my EB-5 green card is being produced, which is very good news. However, I am currently abroad (for more than half a year already) and do expect to be abroad for more than a year in total for personal emergency reasons. Normally, I understand you can apply for a re-entry permit while present in the U.S. So, for my case, I am already abroad and received a green card while abroad. My AP was recently renewed as well and is valid for two years. What should I do in this case in order not to abandon the green card? Is there a way to apply for re-entry abroad? And if not, does the clock start ticking when I received the green card for a year before risking abandonment, or when I left the U.S. a few months ago?

Answers

Ed Beshara

Ed Beshara

Immigration Attorneys
Answered on

Apply for a re-entry permit.

Lynne Feldman

Lynne Feldman

Immigration Attorneys
Answered on

If at all possible, I would make a quick trip to the U.S. and return with the PR card. If you anticipate being gone more than a year, then also apply for a reentry permit while on U.S. soil.

Bernard P Wolfsdorf

Bernard P Wolfsdorf

Immigration Attorneys
Answered on

You should re-enter the U.S. either with your parole document or preferably with the green card of both can have it sent, and then file a reentry permit.

Stephen Berman

Stephen Berman

Immigration Attorneys
Answered on

Get back to the U.S. immediately and get your card. Then you can file for a reentry permit.

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